OLD BRISTOL NORTH BATHS

Project:  Redevelopment of Edwardian Baroque bathhouse into offices, Gloucester Road, Bristol  

Client:    Berkeley Place 

Bristol North Baths, a Grade II listed Edwardian style building, was closed in October 2005 as part of a review into swimming facilities in the city. Plans for the previous redevelopment included the new library, residential apartments and community health centre with Edwardian features of the building retained within the proposals. However throughout its history, whether through modernisation or upgrading, works undertaken have covered over features or removed others entirely. Similarly, as part of the latest part refurbishment works to a health centre, some features including the cast iron first floor gallery balustrade have been partly covered over. Certain internal features remain visible, such as the Italian floor with art nouveau inspired motif, doors and panelling in the main entrance and these, alongside the remaining historic elements are to be retained. The previous developers were unable to complete the works and in 2015 the building was brought back under the control of Bristol City Council, and has remained derelict ever since.

 

Working closely alongside the client Berkeley Place, the recently consented proposals will bring the old baths back into use as offices. Spaces on ground floor will be let to start up and incubator tenants with a local business acting as anchor tenant on the first floor. Here the intention is to remove the small consultation rooms and replace with partitions  more in keeping with the style and grandeur of the building creating two pairs of large open plan offices.  A café, break out areas, gym and associated changing facilities for occupiers is also to be provided. Keep checking back here for regular updates including information on available desk space within the ground floor offices.  

Photos

Cryer & Coe 

Gloucester Road image - Know Your Place Vaughan Postcards

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